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Trump Will Throw You Under The Bus (To the tune of Wheels on the Bus)  

 

Trump Will Throw You Under The Bus

In order to make himself a quick buck

He can't be trusted, he's bad luck

He'll throw you under the bus.

 

Trump has cheated on all his wives (1)

Trump has cheated all his life

Trump is a fraud who's been caught

Committing white collar crime.

In New York for a second time.

 

The Trumps steal from charlities

That share their name for their own needs,

To pay for his legal fees

Cuz he's the one in need,

Yeah he's the one in need.

 

 

Trump Will Throw You Under The Bus 

In order to make himself a quick buck 

He can't be trusted, he's bad luck 

He'll throw you under the bus.

 

A judge has ordered him to produce 

DNA so they can prove. 

If E Jean Carroll is telling the truth 

When she says that he raped her 

While buying furniture(2) 

+60

When DJT was on a bus 

With Billy Bush, he told us 

That he went down on hard..like a bitch 

I forced on her a kiss. 

+19

Trump will put his hand on your cunt

Call you a bitch and try to steal a fuck

He can't be trusted, He's bad luck

Put an unwanted kiss upon your lips

And then he'll throw you under the bus,

 

I believe Temple Taggart, Kristin Anderson and  
Jessical Leeds,  

When they say that DJT  

Used them for his own needs  

Obscenly - instead of - romantically.

 

Jessica Leeds was on a plane

And she was offered a better seat

She was excited to get the upgrade

Then she met DJT

In the adjoining seat

 

She talked to him while they ate dinner

Then he lost control of his hands

When he got his hands on her genitals

She went back to her original seat

Where she meant to be

 

Trump has friends who are like him

Greedy men who pimp  and pimp

He said that Epstein was a great guy

Who like beautiful women

Almost as much as him+1

 

Maria Farmer went to the FBI  

In 1996 to report Epstein's crimes  
She said, "They were so dismissive that I just fealt daunted and I stopped."  

As they brushed her complaint aside.  

Maxwell threatened her life.  

And Epstein continued his crimes. 

+10

If you are in the nightclub  

And you got pussy a to grab  

He'll tell Billy Bush So that they can laugh  

As they get off the bus.

+6

Joe Biden is a decent man

Who doesn't associate with the Klan

Sometimes He's too much of a Republican

But he's got a Coronavirus plan

 

https://joebiden.com/covid-plan/

 

Joe wrote a bill with Orin Hatch

The Violence Against Women Act

It protections for victims of abuse

You should support it too.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Violence_Against_Women_Act

+5

If you got the Coronavirus

Trump has thrown you under the bus

He's against testing for all of us

He don't think we're worth the fuss

.https://www.vox.com/2020/5/15/21259888/trump-coronavirus-testing-very-few-cases

 

Trump Will Throw You Under The Bus,

In order to make himself a quick buck,

He can't be trusted, he's bad luck,

He'll throw you under the bus.

 

If you were raped as a teen,

By trafficker Jeffrey Epstein,

Donald will not call the police,

He'll say Epstein great guy.

 

https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/trump-called-epstein-a-terrific-guy-before-denying-relationship-with-him/2019/07/08/a01e0f00-a1be-11e9-bd56-eac6bb02d01d_story.html

Guiffre worked at Mar a Lago

Where she was recruited by Epstein to give massages

She then got sexually abused

This is how Trump lets his business get used.

+2

4) https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/trump-called-epstein-a-terrific-guy-before-denying-relationship-with-him/2019/07/08/a01e0f00-a1be-11e9-bd56-eac6bb02d01d_story.html


 

If you want to vote by mail

Donald Trump wants you to fail

His followers say "Sigh Heil"

And the US mail is for sale

(3)

+5

On the Apprentice he wasnt the boss 

Somebody else was paying the cost 

To pay the reality TV show host

He's throwing us under the bus.

+2

They gave the guy a TV show and all he does is talk

He does not help anybody he doesn't walk the walk

He can't fight his own battles

 

Virginia Roberts Giuffre 

Tara Reade 

Christine Oxenberg 

Learned about the Lolita Express 

Which Clinton rode when 

1) https://www.newsweek.com/how-many-times-trump-cheated-wives-780550

2) https://lawandcrime.com/high-profile/obviously-required-to-provide-it-trump-given-deadlines-to-produce-dna-in-e-jean-carrolls-defamation-lawsuit/

3) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Louis_DeJoy

 

 

I Want You to Remember Ali Ismaeel Abbas by Greg Spence Wolf 

I Want You to Remember ... Ali Ismael Abbas. 

Ali Ismaeel Abbas lost his arms in an attack, 

An aerial missile attack against the people of Iraq, 

He was twelve when the bombs fell, 

His life matters so I want you to remember. 

He said, “The house collapsed on us. The fire was all over. 

He said "I heard so much screaming from my family." 

“After this one of my neighbours came and took me out .... 

… and put me in a car and sent me to hospital.” 

Ali Ismaeel Abbas lost his mom in an attack 

That was authorized by Congress against the country of Iraq 

She was pregnant when the bombs struck 

Her life matters so I want you to remember 

Ali Ismaeel Abbas lost his dad in an attack 

That was ordered by George Bush against the nation of Iraq 

One of thirteen family member who were killed or dismembered 

Their lives matter so I want you to remember 

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ali_Ismail_Abbas

Justice for Victim's of State and Vigilante Violence. 

Manuel Ellis says, "Can't breathe sir, can't breathe." while dying in Tacoma Police Custody on Tuesday, March 3, 2020.

 

According to a report in the Tacoma News Tribune; 

On March 3, 2020. Manual Ellis was killed in the custody of the Tacoma Police Department. A recording of the incident reveals him saying at 1:40, "Can't Breath sir. Can't breathe." 

Sources:

https://www.thenewstribune.com/opinion/editorials/article243427631.html  

https://www.thenewstribune.com/news/local/crime/article243414696.html

 

 

 
  Amadou Diallo Didn't Have A Gun

 
 

 
Amadou Diallo didn't have a gun 
Amadou Diallo wasn't a threat 
Amadou Diallo didn't hurt anyone 
Amadou Diallo was a target. 
He was shot dead for no good reason 
In the vestibule of his home 

 

Amadou Diallo lived in the Bronks 
Where he was shot dead by four cops 
When he reached into his wallet 
To pull out his wallet 
Let me tell you about one of those cops 
  
His name is Kenneth Boss and he's killed before. 
I'm concerned he's going to do it again. 
Unless we take away his badge and his weapon. 
It's a license to kill unarmed black men. 

They were undercover and wearing bulletproogf vests 
"I was wearing blue jeans," one of them said under oath. 
But still they acted like he was the threat. 
And they pumped his body full of lead. 

They didn't shoot him once, 
They didn't shoot him twice, 
They shot him 41 times, 
They weren't content just to tke his life. 
It wasn't self defense it was homicide. 
  
Amadou Diallo didn't have a gun, 
Amadou Diallo wasn't a threat, 
Amadou Diallo didn't hurt anyone, 
Amadou Diallo hasn't had justice yet. 

After they killed him they shook down his roommate 
We're they trying to find out who his enemies were 
Were they trying to pin it on somebody else 
Were they trying to get away with murder. 
© Greg Spence Wolf 08/30/2020 
 

Unequal Access to Education in the USA 

School Law Research Paper 

Greg Spence Wolf 

Unequal Access to Education in the USA 

August 26, 2017 

City University -Tacoma 

Alt Routes to Certification 

EDU 321 School Law for Teachers 

Professor Thom Dramer 

Abstract 

Unequal Access to Education in the United States of America 

Article 1, Section 8 of the Constitution grants Congress the power to collect taxes provide for the general Welfare of the United States. 

Therefore funding education through taxes is constitutional. 

Amendment 14, Article 1 of the US constitution states, “nor shall any state deprive any person of life, liberty, or property, without due process of law; nor deny to any person within its jurisdiction the equal protection of the laws.” 

Therefore denying equal access to education is unconstitutional. 

Not all Americans have enjoyed equal protection under the law or equal access to education. This paper focuses on two cases that set major precedents that influenced the law and future court decisions for decades. One ruling Plessy vs Ferguson denied equality to African-Americans and set a precedent that discrimination was allowed by law. 

The later decision, Brown v. The Board of Education of Topeka Kansas reversed this flawed decision previous case and established the precedent that discrimination is not legal in the USA. 

“Segregated public schools are not equal and cannot be made equal.”1 was the opinion of the Supreme court on May 17, 1954 when they decided unanimously on Brown vs The Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas to forbid school segregation in the United States. 

This case came from five groups of plaintiffs from the States of Kansas, South Carolina, Virginia, Delaware and the District of Columbia. They were represented by the NAACP's Legal Defense Fund. 2(http://www.naacpldf.org/case/brown-v-board-education). 

In the ruling Chief Justice Earl Warren pointed out that: “Education is perhaps the most important function of state and local governments.” It is a principal instrument in awakening the child to cultural values, in preparing him for later professional training, and in helping him to adjust normally to his environment.”3 

In the court's opinion “Such an opportunity, where the state has undertaken 

to provide it, is a right which must be made available to all on equal terms.” 

He concluded with a question: 

“Does segregation of children in public schools solely on the basis of race, even though the physical facilities and other "tangible" factors may be equal, deprive the children of the minority group of equal educational opportunities?” 

And an answer: 

“We believe that it does.”4 

Summary of the five cases: 

Brown v. Board of Education: 

“The plaintiffs were Negro children of elementary school age residing in Topeka. They brought this action,” because “of a Kansas statute which,” permitted “cities of more than 15,000 population to maintain separate school facilities for negro and white students.” 5. So, “The Topeka Board of Education elected to establish segregated elementary schools. The three-judge District Court, convened” and 6(28 U.S.C. §§ 2281 and 2284), 

found that segregation in public education has a detrimental effect upon Negro children, but denied relief on the ground that the Negro and white schools were substantially equal with respect to buildings, transportation, curricula, and educational qualifications of teachers.”7 

Briggs v. Elliott: 

The plaintiffs were Negro children of both elementary and high school age. The United States District Court for the Eastern District of South Carolina found that the Negro schools were inferior to the white schools, and ordered the defendants to begin immediately to equalize the facilities. But the court sustained the validity of the contested provisions and denied the plaintiffs admission to the white schools during the equalization program. 8. This Court vacated the District Court's judgment and remanded the case for the purpose of obtaining the court's views on a report filed by the defendants concerning the progress made in the equalization program.” 9 

Davis v. County School Board: 

“The plaintiffs were Negro children of high school age residing in Prince Edward County. They brought this action” because, “of provisions in the state constitution and statutory code which require the segregation of Negroes and whites in public schools. The three-judge District Court, convene,d” an, “denied the requested relief. The court found the Negro school inferior in physical plant, curricula, and transportation, and ordered the defendants forthwith to provide substantially equal curricula and transportation and to proceed with all reasonable diligence and dispatch to remove the inequality in physical plant. But, as in the South Carolina case, the court sustained the validity of the contested provisions and denied the plaintiffs admission to the white schools during the equalization program.10 10(103 F.Supp. 337.) 

Gebhart v. Belto: 

“The plaintiffs were Negro children of both elementary and high school age. They brought this action in the Delaware Court of Chancery,” because “of provisions in the state constitution and statutory code which require the segregation of Negroes and whites in public schools. 11 

The Chancellor gave judgment for the plaintiffs and ordered their immediate admission to schools previously attended only by white children, on the ground that the Negro schools were inferior with respect to teacher training, pupil-teacher ratio, extracurricular activities, physical plant, and time and distance involved in travel. 12(87 A.2d 862.) The Chancellor also found that segregation itself results in an inferior education for Negro children, but did not rest his decision on that ground. The Chancellor's decree was affirmed by the Supreme Court of Delaware, which intimated, however, that the defendants might be able to obtain a modification of the decree after equalization of the Negro and white schools had been accomplished. The defendants, contending only that the Delaware courts had erred in ordering the immediate admission of the Negro plaintiffs to the white schools, applied to this Court for certiorari. The writ was granted, 12 

These decisions reversed Plessy v. Ferguson which was decided on On May 19, 1896 by the Supreme Court. In that case they ruled on a Louisiana law that required separate railway cars for blacks and whites. “In 1892, Homer A. Plessy, a man with one-eighth Negro blood who lived in New Orleans challenged that city's right to segregate public transportation by riding in a Whites Only rail car. The Louisiana state courts ruled against Plessy, and his subsequent appeal to the U. S. Supreme Court was denied in 1896.13 Justice Henry Billings Brown wrote the decision. He conceded that the 14th Amendment intended to establish absolute equality for the races before the law. Then he claimed: 

It could not have been intended to abolish distinctions based upon color 

or to enforce social, as distinguished from political equality 

or a commingling of the two races unsatisfactory to either." 

In my opinion Billings is saying that 'white people have the privilege to deny 

black people their rights if they find it unsatisfactory.'14 

The Legal Defense Fund's victory in 1954 did not end segregation or the Supreme Court's involvement in the issue. In Griffin v. County School Bd. of Prince Edward County, the Supreme Court gave relief to the plaintiffs when Prince Edward School District school tried to evade the Warren Court's decision by sending white kids to private schools that discriminated. The court ruled that, “the closing of the Prince Edward County public schools while at the same time giving tuition grants and tax concessions to assist white children in private segregated schools denied petitioners the equal protection of the laws guaranteed by the Fourteenth Amendment.”15 

When asked by Justice Felix Frankfurter during the argument what he meant by "equal," Thurgood Marshall replied, "Equal means getting the same thing, at the same time, and in the same place."16 

References: 

Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka (1). (n.d.). Oyez. Retrieved August 21, 2017, from https://www.oyez.org/cases/1940-1955/347us483) 

Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka (1). (n.d.). Oyez. Retrieved August 22, 2017, from https://www.oyez.org/cases/1940-1955/347us483)(Del.Const., Art. X, § 2; Del.Rev.Code § 2631 (1935) 

Griffin v. School Board of Prince Edward County. (n.d.). Oyez. Retrieved August 25, 2017, from https://www.oyez.org/cases/1963/592 

http://www.naacpldf.org/case/brown-v-board-education Retrieved August 21, 2017 

http://www.naacpldf.org/thurgood-marshall retrieved August 24, 2017 

https://supreme.justia.com/cases/federal/us/347/483/case.html98 F.Supp. 529. Retrieved August 21, 2017 

https://supreme.justia.com/cases/federal/us/347/483/case.html, retrieved, August 21, 2017 

(98 F.Supp. 797 / https://supreme.justia.com/cases/federal/us/347/483/case.html#1 

retrieved August 21, 2017) 

Plessy v. Ferguson. (n.d.). Oyez. Retrieved August 20, 2017, from https://www.oyez.org/cases/1850-1900/163us537 

1(Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka (1). (n.d.). Oyez. Retrieved August 21, 2017, from https://www.oyez.org/cases/1940-1955/347us483) 

2http://www.naacpldf.org/case/brown-v-board-education Retrieved August 21, 2017 

3(Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka (1). (n.d.). Oyez. Retrieved August 21, 2017, from https://www.oyez.org/cases/1940-1955/347us483) 

4https://supreme.justia.com/cases/federal/us/347/483/case.html Retrieved August 21, 2017 

5 https://supreme.justia.com/cases/federal/us/347/483/case.html, retrieved, August 21, 2017 

6 https://supreme.justia.com/cases/federal/us/347/483/case.html, retrieved, August 21, 2017 

7(98 F.Supp. 797 / https://supreme.justia.com/cases/federal/us/347/483/case.html#1 retrieved August 21, 2017) 

8 https://supreme.justia.com/cases/federal/us/347/483/case.html98 F.Supp. 529. Retrieved August 21, 2017 

9https://supreme.justia.com/cases/federal/us/347/483/case.html retrieve August 21, 2017 

10 https://supreme.justia.com/cases/federal/us/347/483/case.html(under 28 U.S.C. §§ 2281 and 2284 Retrieved August 21, 2017 

11 Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka (1). (n.d.). Oyez. Retrieved August 22, 2017, from https://www.oyez.org/cases/1940-1955/347us483)(Del.Const., Art. X, § 2; Del.Rev.Code § 2631 (1935)) 

12 Brown v. Board of Education of Topeka (1). (n.d.). Oyez. Retrieved August 22, 2017, from https://www.oyez.org/cases/1940-1955/347us483) 

13(Plessy v. Ferguson. (n.d.). Oyez. Retrieved August 20, 2017, from https://www.oyez.org/cases/1850-1900/163us537) 

14Plessy v. Ferguson. (n.d.). Oyez. Retrieved August 25, 2017, from https://www.oyez.org/cases/1850-1900/163us537 

15Griffin v. School Board of Prince Edward County. (n.d.). Oyez. Retrieved August 25, 2017, from https://www.oyez.org/cases/1963/592 

16 http://www.naacpldf.org/thurgood-marshall retrieved August 24, 2017